Unit HomeNewsNews Article Display
Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany

 

Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany


Readiness Enabler for Operational Forces  •
Drought increases water restrictions

By Nathan L. Hanks Jr. | | July 14, 2011

SHARE
Even though recent rains have brought some relief to the Southwest Georgia region, Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany officials urge everyone to conserve water, here.

“If the drought worsens, Georgia Environmental Protection Division will continue to issue stricter rules regarding the usage of water outdoors,” Robert L. Metts, environmental protection specialist, Installation and Environment Division, MCLB Albany, said.

“In the past, we know the summer months, on average, have been dry,” Metts said.  “If the drought continues to worsen, additional measures will be taken. We do not know how long the drought will last so it is imperative that everyone continue to do their part to conserve water.”

Even though one of the four drought levels has not been imposed here, yet, Metts stressed the importance of conserving water, both indoors and outdoors. Base residents can help by washing full loads of laundry and limiting time in the shower. 

Military units wanting to hold car washes must contact the Environmental Branch office for permission.  While brushing your teeth or shaving, turn the water off and then when you need to rinse, turn the water back on, officials recommend.

Only water your plants when they show signs of moisture stress and use mulch to prevent evaporation was additional guidance.  

Some people use water to wash down their driveways and carports. Try sweeping these areas to help conserve water, officials said.

There are four drought levels:

Drought Level One - Outdoor water use may occur on scheduled days within the hours of midnight to 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to midnight.

(a) Scheduled days for odd-numbered addresses are Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.

(b) Scheduled days for even-numbered addresses are Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.

(c) Use of hydrants for any purpose other than firefighting, public health, safety or flushing is prohibited.

Drought Level Two - Outdoor water use may occur on scheduled days within the hours of midnight to 10 a.m.

(a) Scheduled days for odd-numbered addresses are Tuesdays, Thursdays and Sundays.

(b) Scheduled days for even-numbered addresses and golf course fairways are Mondays, Wednesdays and Saturdays.

(c) The following uses are prohibited:

1) Using hydrants for any purpose other than firefighting, public health, safety or flushing.

2) Washing hard surfaces, such as streets, gutters, sidewalks and driveways except when necessary for public health and safety.

Drought Level Three - Outdoor water use may occur on the scheduled day between the hours of midnight and 10 a.m.

(a) The scheduled day for odd-numbered addresses is Sunday.

(b) The scheduled day for even-numbered addresses and golf course fairways is Saturday.

(c) The following uses are prohibited:

  1.  Using hydrants for any purpose other than firefighting, public health, safety or flushing.

  2.  Washing hard surfaces, such as streets, gutters, sidewalks, driveways, except when necessary for public health and safety.

  3.  Filling installed swimming pools except when necessary for health care or structural     integrity.

 4.  Washing vehicles, such as cars, boats, trailers, motorbikes, airplanes or golf carts.

 5.  Washing buildings or structures except for immediate fire protection.

 6.  Non-commercial fund-raisers, such as car washes.

 7.  Using water for ornamental purposes, such as fountains, reflecting pools and waterfalls, except when necessary to support aquatic life.

Drought Level Four - No outdoor water use is allowed, other than for activities exempted in 391-3-30-.05, or as the EPD director may order.

 No one is allowed to water on Fridays.

“Since the end of May, conditions in the Southern two-thirds of the state have deteriorated from extreme to exceptional drought, the highest drought category,” David E. Stooksbury, professor of engineering and graduate coordinator for atmospheric sciences, University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, said.

“These drought conditions are expected to last through the summer, with a chance conditions could worsen through at least the middle of August,” he said.

“The only hope for widespread drought will be from tropical weather systems,” Stooksbury said in a May 5 press release.

Georgia doesn’t experience tropical weather until late summer and fall, according to Stooksbury.

For information about the drought, call the Environmental Branch Office at (229) 639-5637 or visit www.georgiadrought.org.

For more information about water conservation, visit the Web site, www.georgiaepd.com.

Frequently asked questions about water restrictions:

Q. To whom do water-use restrictions apply?

A. The restrictions apply to everyone in the state, to one extent or another. Some water authorities have put total outdoor water use bans in place.  Contact your water authority for the restrictions in place for your address.  

There is certain outdoor water uses allowed daily at any time of the day.

Commercial agricultural operations as defined in Code Section 1-3-3.

Irrigation of new and replanted plant, seed, or turf in landscapes, golf courses, or sports turf fields during installation and for a period of 30 days following installation.

Irrigation of athletic fields, golf courses, or public turf grass recreation areas.

Q. How do odd/even water-use restrictions work?

A. If homes or businesses have even-numbered street addresses, residents may water outdoors on even-numbered calendar days except during the hours of the water restrictions.

Water restriction times may vary from county to county. If the home or business has an odd-numbered street address, residents may water for outdoor purposes on odd numbered calendar days except during the hours of the water restrictions. Water restriction times may vary from county to county.

An even-numbered street address may not use water for any outdoor watering on an odd-numbered calendar day. Likewise, an odd-numbered street address may not use water for any outdoor watering on an even-numbered calendar day.

Q. How does the EPD decide on times for outdoor water-use restrictions?

A. The EPD set the times for the restrictions based on local water-use patterns.  The times set are based on when the most water is used: businesses use the most during the day to water their landscaping and homeowners use the most water outdoors including washing cars and watering lawns and gardens when they get home from work.

By restricting water use during these times, EPD could quickly affect the amount of water being drawn from the resources available.

Q. When will outdoor water-use restrictions be lifted?

A. When groundwater and surface water resources are severely depleted, it takes almost as many years to get out of drought level as it takes to get into it. Even when it seems it’s been raining every day, the water resources haven’t yet recharged. 

There is still and is always a need to conserve water resources.

Q. Does the ban announced by EPD apply to the filling of private swimming pools or other water toys (sliding mats, sprinklers, etc.)?

A. The ban does apply to the filling of private swimming pools and other home/recreational uses. Like any other outdoor water uses, residents can use water recreationally outside the hours of the bans, according to the restrictions in place for their address.


SHARE