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LOGCOM selects warehouseman as Marine of the Year

By Pamela Jackson, Public Affairs Specialist | | November 4, 2010

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To receive the title Marine of the Quarter means a Marine upholds the standards of the Marine Corps in such a way that it is recognized by peers and superiors.

To earn the title Marine of the Year simply means “the best of the best.”

Cpl. Ricky W. Louidor, warehouseman, Fleet Support Division, Marine Corps Logistics Command, holds both honors.

A native of Haiti, Louidor is a 2004 graduate of Maynard Evans High School in Orlando, Fla. He left home for recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., June 14, 2004, completed Marine Combat Training at Marine Corps Base Camp Geiger, N.C., and reported for duty at FSD here in January 2008.

“This award is given to those who exemplify the Marine Corps’ standards and ethos within their peer group,” said Master Sgt. Rolanda D. Bailey, staff noncommissioned officer-in-charge, Supported Activity Supply System Retrograde Branch, FSD. “Corporal Louidor is quiet and his dedication, professionalism and concern for his fellow Marines set the standard for all to emulate. He inspires others without drawing much attention to himself.”

Louidor’s primary responsibility is to keep Warehouse 1260 squared away. He and other personnel, receive, pack, ship and conduct regular inventory of the items stored there.

“I’ve been through some difficult times and have had many challenges, but I did not get stuck in a rut,” he said. “I had the choice to keep moving forward or remain where I was and complain. I chose to move forward and not let hardships keep me from doing and being my best. I was motivated to get back on track and turn my life around, which is what I have done.”

Louidor noted even though he has had personal and professinal hardships, attending the recently-held corporals’ course here and the support of his noncommissioned officer-in-charge prepared him for this next level as a Marine.

“Corporal Louidor experienced a setback in his career, but had the patience to persevere. He took a negative experience and turned it into a positive one,” Bailey said. “He remembers where he came from and the struggles and triumphs he has endured to become the Marine of the Year. Most importantly he uses his experience to mentor other Marines.”

Not every Marine gets the opportunity to win Marine of the Year. Only those who have previously won the title of NCO or Marine of the Quarter throughout the year are eligible to be on the Marine of the Year board.

1st Sgt. Shane E. Henson, company first sergeant, LOGCOM, said it is easy to talk about Marines such as Louidor.

“His maturity and professionalism are what makes him stand out,” he said. “This young man has done great things and represented this command well in his actions. I try to offer as many tangible incentives as possible by passing on information regarding Marine or NCO of the Quarter and Year opportunities. The Marine Corps will most likely draw down after Afghanistan and there will be fewer re-enlistment opportunities. Accolades such as this will make Marines like him rise to the top.”

Louidor wants to be a master electrician and aspires to one day have his own business. He plans to start classes at Albany Technical College to pursue his goal and major in electronics technology.

“My career plans are to remain in the Marine Corps. Why should I stop now when I have the opportunity to move forward and do great things? Who knows, maybe I could be a sergeant major by the time I retire,” he said. “I want other Marines to see that even though they may make mistakes, it is a personal choice to learn from it and triumph over it. I did it and others can too.”


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