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Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany


Readiness Enabler for Operational Forces  •
Base officials offer ground safety training

By Pamela Jackson | | August 19, 2010

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To ensure Marines and civilian-Marines maintain safe working and living environments, Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany officials are conducting the Ground Safety for Marines Course, which began Aug. 9 and continues through Friday.

“The Ground Safety for Marines Course is the qualification course for Marines assigned as the unit safety officer.  It is a rigorous and comprehensive course provided by the Marine Corps’ Training and Education Command,” said Merrill Dickinson, installation safety manager, Risk Management Office, MCLB Albany. “It is delivered at several locations worldwide to Marines and civilian- Marines.  Graduates are expected to return to their units and support their senior leadership in executing the full spectrum of requirements in the Marine Corps Safety Program.”

According to the letter of instruction, the course is designed to provide occupational safety and health training to military and civilian personnel assigned to full-time or collateral duties in ground safety.

The LOI further states that upon successful completion of the course, Marines will be qualified for the secondary 8012 military occupational specialty of 8012 and 9571for sailors.

Marine Corps Order 5100.29A, Marine Corps Safety Program, dated July 1, 2004, states that commanders incorporate operational risk management in all operations, assuring controls are in place for any hazard that cannot be completely eliminated, and providing appropriate safe and healthful facilities for all personnel.

“We normally send our unit safety officers to Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, N.C., or Marine Corps Base Quantico, Va., to attend the GSM, but with the help of the Marine Corps Installations East regional safety director, we were able to host a course here at MCLB Albany,” Dickinson said.

Conducting the training here reduces temporary additional duty costs and provides an opportunity to involve the base’s tenant commands and organizations as well as build some depth in the installation’s pool of qualified safety officers, he said. 

“I deal with a lot of contractors, so learning about and understanding the Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards for safety and mishap reporting was very beneficial,” said Antron S. Patton, contract surveillance representative, Public Works Department, Installation and Environment Division, MCLB Albany. “Learning how to conduct a job hazard analysis in the workplace was very informative because we (Public Works) have a lot of hazards I was not aware of.  I can now go back and make sure we have those incidences documented and all employees are trained on how to report hazards.”

Dickinson said the course is taught by qualified instructors from MCIEAST, but his office is augmenting them by teaching some of the more technical topics. 

“We’ve also had instructor support from the Maintenance Center Albany, Naval Branch Health Clinic, and the Fire Department,” he said. “We (are) eager to help teach the course because it allows us an opportunity to tailor the content of the presentations from a Corps’ view to a MCLB Albany view.  It’s worked out exceptionally well and I hope to be able to bring the GSM course back to Albany in the future.”

Johnny Little, safety specialist, RMO, said the course was very beneficial for him even though he has safety experience, and is also good for those who are new.

 “We have been discussing mishaps and investigations and other information we can share with other agencies and what can be shared.  We are also learning how to follow the rules of the Navy Safety Center and Navy Criminal Investigative Services,” he said.

For those who were not able to attend the training, course information can be provided by calling the installation safety office at (229) 639-5249.


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