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MCA: 100th humvee rolls off the line in record time

By Jason M. Webb | | June 4, 2009

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Monday, workers at Maintenance Center Albany celebrated a landmark accomplishment of producing 100 humvees in one month.

The event highlighted all efforts of MCA’s employees, which collectively made history by repairing the record number of vehicles within an average of a 32-day Repair Cycle Time.

“I want to thank each and every one of you for making this a reality,” said Col. Daniel J. Gillan, commander, MCA.

The current humvee repair program was started in 2007, and at that time the average production rate was 20 humvees per month within a 70 day RCT.    

“Due to the efforts and personal involvement of the entire workforce, this extraordinary effort was accomplished because of workforce dedication and professionalism to meet every challenge head-on with resolve in mind,” said Elwood Carter, manager, Production Control Branch, MCA. “This provides the warfighter with what they deserve; the best equipment from the best Maintenance Depot for the best fighting force in the world. An outstanding achievement by all.”

Maintenance support for the widely used military vehicle was stopped in 1997 with the idea of replacing the humvee with another type of vehicle. 

The events of 9-11 and the following war effort changed that plan, and a need to repair the current stockpile arose. 

MCA had not performed complete refurbishment on a humvee in more than a decade. 

Materials and parts were not on hand, therefore a material forecast had to be developed, orders placed and personnel needed to be hired and trained the momentous task.

According to Carter, in 2007 MCA started working what is called a “cold line” at one of the remote areas outside the fence line at building 1310, commonly referred to as the rail head. 

The initial number of workers totaled only four at the very beginning, but the numbers of employees and production requirements output quickly grew to meet production schedules. 

Originally, materials and vehicle components were routed into the repair cycle and traveled approximately 30,000 linear fleet while undergoing maintenance processes. 

After establishing this initial process to repair the vehicles, the maintenance center reviewed its processes to see where improvements could be made to increase production speed and reduce material movement. 

After further review, it was determined that several types of vehicles, that required lesser production rates, could be moved to other areas of the                    maintenance center to free up a larger work space for humvee production.

This enabled the maintenance center to continue to meet the production requirements of other equipment as well as making the production line for the            humvee more efficient.

Currently, material travels less than half the original 30,000 ft. previously required. 

“This thing started cold two years ago. We stood it up from doing 22 trucks a month to this monster that is right now with 158 people making 100 trucks a month,” added Allen Brown, supervisor, shop 718, MCA.

According to Carter, production is at its highest rate, and MCA personnel continue to review and improve processes that will increase production rates each month.

“MCA celebrates this accomplishment due to its employee’s efforts and work ethic to embrace every challenge, and perform with the utmost professionalism, to meet the demands and needs of America’s warfighter,” Carter said.

According to Gillian, the goal is to produce 120 humvees per month in the next couple of months.

“The sky’s the limit,” said Gillan who arrived at the center in July 2007.


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