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Marine Corps Logistics Base Albany


Readiness Enabler for Operational Forces  •
Easter eggs, ancient tradition still fun

By Sgt. Phuong Chau | | April 15, 2003

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"Over there!" yelled a little girl, scooping a fluorescent egg into her basket and proudly adding it to the brightly-colored shapes already filling her container.More than 150 children took part in the annual Marine Corps Community Services Easter Egg hunt Saturday outside the Base Conference Center.According to the World Book Encyclopedia, ancient Egyptians and Persians exchanged eggs in ancient times. They dyed the eggs in spring colors and presented them as gifts. Eggs were included in the Jews' Passover Feast as a representation of the renewal of life. Accordingly, early Christians associated eggs with the first Easter, which occurred near the time of the Passover celebration. Eventually, colored eggs were made for Easter, and some Europeans died eggs red to represent the joy of the resurrection.Easter is still celebrated with colored eggs today, and the base community is no exception. The Easter tradition continued with the egg hunt, games and other prize giveaways. After the arrival of the Easter Bunny, the signal was given for the egg hunt to begin, and children raced to find the most eggs.Amy Frey, wife of Capt. Christopher Frey, MatCom analyst here, did not know that infants were allowed to participate in the egg hunt. Her 1-year-old son Collin seemed to enjoy his first Easter Egg Hunt, she said."I think this is great," said Frey.Joni Bennett, wife of Capt. Charlie Bennett, a deployed National Guardsman, reported she appreciated the base inviting the Army National Guard to participate in the event."This is such a terrific day, and we appreciate being a part of it," said Bennett.Many children such as 4-year-old Kryssa Henderson, daughter of Virginia Wells of the Child Development Center, stuffed their mouths full of the candy hidden inside the plastic eggs.Wells said Kryssa had lots of fun at the annual event, answering for her daughter who couldn't speak around a mouthful of chocolate.Children also participated in games and some had their faces painted by event staff members.Garrett Tate, 6-year-old son of Cindy Tate, encased in protective gear and masking tape, took a barrage of Q-tip projectiles from the other children in one game. One group of children fired blue Q-tips while the other group fired red Q-tips. The team with the most Q-tips stuck on Tate won a prize. "I think this was hilarious," said Tate's mother, who laughed at her son being covered in the hygienic tool."This was a chance to give back to the MCLB family," said Paula Caserio, event coordinator Paula Caserio, who was obviously pleased with the turnout.
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