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MCLC: key player in resetting forces

By Cpl. Denyelle D. Spillane | | May 14, 2003

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As Operation Iraqi Freedom, only one phase of the war on terrorism, comes to a close, the Corps' mission focus is changing to reconstitution. The Marine Corps Logistics Command will play an even more important role in reconstitution. According to Commandant of the Marine Corps Gen. Michael W. Hagee, the Marine Corps Logistics Command will be the key player in the mission to complete rollback and reconstitution.Rollback is the process of collecting, repairing and reconstituting all the equipment used during an operation. Marine forces identify their equipment requirements and the MCLC supports those requirements."Now that sustainment for Operation Iraqi Freedom is over," Capt. Peter Mahoney said, "LogCom is leaning forward to conduct in-theater equipment assessments, and on-site decisions will be made to prepare for retrograde and depot repair." Mahoney is an analyst in the Future Operations Section of MCLC's Strategic Planning Branch.Reconstitution involves all three core capabilities of the command's mission - to provide supply-chain management, depot-level maintenance and strategic prepositioning capability for the operating forces to maximize readiness.MCLC has completed the initial planning and is currently assessing the repairs that will be required.After the assessments are made, the gear will be brought here or to the Marine Corps Logistics Base in Barstow, Calif., for repair, rebuild and, eventually, redistribution.Simply put, reconstitution means resetting the operating forces to their pre-war capabilities. Supporting the reconstitution phase is next.Planning, forecasting and prioritizing for the execution of the mission of reconstitution, regeneration and redeployments supports the command's operations. According to Mahoney, MCLC has processes in place to manage fulfilling operational needs. MCLC is in constant communication with forward forces to ensure responsiveness to those needs.Part of the equation has begun - redistributing equipment that did not need repairs, Maj. James Blair said. Blair is the project officer for the Amphibious Assault Vehicle Reliability, Availability, Maintainability/Rebuild to Standard Program in the MCLC's Maintenance Directorate.According to Blair, if the equipment requires depot maintenance before redistribution, it go through one of the Marine Corps Maintenance Centers for repair as part of the master work schedule.The maintenance efforts depend in large part on the units' requirements. Each Maintenance Center can modify existing equipment, assist in prototype development, execute full-depot overhaul, rebuild principle-end items or inspect and repair only as needed - which means they work on all the Corps' ground equipment."The actual timeframe of the reconstitution is unknown at this time," Blair said. "It depends on equipment condition, priorities, resetting the force objectives and many other factors. MCLC remains engaged and ready to provide responsive support until reconstitution is complete."An advance element, with personnel from Systems Command, LogCom and the Blount Island Command in Jacksonville, Fla., left this week to begin assessments and will be gone up to 90 days.
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